Brain connectivity missing in ADHD. Sarasota, Florida, Dr. John Lieurance - Advanced Rejuvenation
Brain connectivity missing in ADHD. Sarasota, Florida, Dr. John Lieurance - Advanced Rejuvenation
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Brain connectivity missing in ADHD. Sarasota, Florida, Dr. John Lieurance

10 Jul Brain connectivity missing in ADHD. Sarasota, Florida, Dr. John Lieurance

Washington, Jan 12 : A new research has provided the first direct evidence that brain connectivity is missing in people with ADHD.

According to researchers at the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain and M. I. N. D. Institute, two brain areas fail to connect when children with ADHD attempt a task that measures attention.

“This is the first time that we have direct evidence that this connectivity is missing in ADHD,” said Ali Mazaheri, postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Mind and Brain.

Mazaheri and his colleagues made the discovery by analyzing the brain

measured in children with ADHD.

The electrical rhythms from the brains of volunteers, especially the alpha rhythm. When part of the brain is emitting alpha rhythms, it shows that it is disengaged from the rest of the brain and not receiving or processing information optimally, Mazaheri said.

In the experiments, children with diagnosed ADHD and normal children were given a simple attention test while their brain waves were measured.

The test consisted of being shown a red or blue image, or hearing a high or low sound, and having to react by pressing a button. Immediately before the test, the children were shown either a letter “V” to alert them that the test would involve a picture (visual), or an inverted “V” representing the letter “A” to alert them that they would hear a sound (auditory)

According to current models of how the brain allocates attention, signals from the frontal cortex — such as the “V” and “A” cues — should alert other parts of the brain, such as the visual processing area at the back of the head, to prepare to pay attention to something. That should be reflected in a drop in alpha wave activity in the visual area, Mazaheri said.

And that is what the researchers found in the brain waves of children without ADHD. But children with the disorder showed no such drop in activity, indicating a disconnection between the center of the brain that allocates attention and the visual processing regions, Mazaheri.

Comment:

This what chiropractic neurologists have been treating and why they have been so successful with these kids. See “disconnected kid syndrome” a great book written by a college. Find it on Amazon.

If you want to learn more about food allergy testing, and utilizing it to create a personalized nutrition and functional neurologic program call my office or e-mail me at drj@advancedwellness.us.

Your’s in Health,

John Lieurance, D.C.

Functional Neurology

E-Mail me at ASKDRJ@Gmail.com

Sarasota, Florida

941 330-8553

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