PROLOTHERAPY FOR ACL INJURY; A DOUBLE BLIND STUDY. - Advanced Rejuvenation
PROLOTHERAPY FOR ACL INJURY; A DOUBLE BLIND STUDY. - Advanced Rejuvenation
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PROLOTHERAPY FOR ACL INJURY; A DOUBLE BLIND STUDY.

07 Jun PROLOTHERAPY FOR ACL INJURY; A DOUBLE BLIND STUDY.

PROLOTHERAPY RESEARCH
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Reeves KD, Hassanein KM. Long-term effects of dextrose prolotherapy for anterior cruciate ligament laxity. Altern Ther Health Med. 2003 May-Jun;9(3):58-62.


CONTEXT: Use of dextrose prolotherapy. Prolotherapy is defined as injection that causes growth of normal cells or tissue.

OBJECTIVE: Determine the 1 and 3 year efficacy of dextrose injection prolotherapy on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) laxity. After year 1, determine patient tolerance of a stronger dextrose concentration (25% versus 10%).

DESIGN: Prospective consecutive patient trial. SETTING: Outpatient physical medicine clinic.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen patients with 6 months or more of knee pain plus ACL knee laxity. This laxity was defined by a KT1000 anterior displacement difference (ADD) of 2 mm or more. INTERVENTION: Intraarticular injection of 6-9 cc of 10% dextrose at months 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10. Injection with 6 cc of 25% dextrose at 12 months. Then, depending on patient preference, injection of either 10% or 25% dextrose every 2-4 months (based on patient preference) through 36 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain at rest, pain on level surfaces, pain on stairs, and swelling. Goniometric flexion range of motion, and KT1000-measured ADD were also measured. All measurements were obtained at 0, 6, 12 and 36 months. RESULTS: Two patients did not reach 6 month data collection, 1 of whom was diagnosed with disseminated cancer. The second was wheelchair-bound and found long-distance travel to the clinic problematic. Sixteen subjects were available for data analysis. KT1000 ADD, measurement indicated that 6 knees measured as normal (not loose) after 6 months, 9 measured as normal after 1 year (6 injections), and 10 measured as normal at 3 years. At the 3 year follow-up, pain at rest, pain with walking, and pain with stair use had improved by 45%, 43%, and 35% respectively. Individual paired t tests indicated subjective swelling improved 63% (P = .017), flexion range of motion improved by 10.5 degrees (P = .002), and KT1000 ADD improved by 71% (P = .002). Eleven out of 16 patients preferred 10% dextrose injection.

CONCLUSION: In patients with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament laxity, intermittent dextrose injection resulted in clinically and statistically significant improvement in ACL laxity, pain, swelling, and knee range of motion.

COMMENT:

This is objective proof that prolotherapy is a valuble option for knee injuries or any injury where rapid natural, healing of a ligament in desired.

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